Visit Jutland: Fields of Gold A visual journey to the rapeseed fields of Denmark

Every spring, one of my favourite things to do is to head out into the warm Danish countryside, where the rapeseed blossom is in full bloom (usually in the months of May and June.)

Rapeseed oil is one of the oldest forms of vegetable oils and can actually also be used in the production of biofuels (biodiesel.)

My advice when it comes to finding a scenic field? There are plenty of fields – get out there and enjoy em!

There is no shortage of rapeseed fields in Denmark – some of my favourite are around the small Danish town of Aabybro, near Aalborg.

Barcelona, Spain – A Visual Essay on Overtourism in the Catalan Capital

Barcelona is a fantastic city with plenty to offer every type of tourist, from palm-fringed beaches, to world-class cuisine and a rich cultural heritage.It is little surprise, therefore, that the Catalan capital is as popular as it is.

However, some would argue that there are too many tourists in Barcelona, so much so, that there have been numerous  protests against the rising tide.

I personally love Barcelona and I understand that tourism drives a big part of the local economy. However, I can certainly comprehend the voices of locals who are tired of unsustainable, mainstream tourism, which is rife throughout the city. Here are some of my images of excessive tourism and its pitfalls in Barcelona.

To quote Banksy, “This is not a photo opportunity”

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Barcelona, Spain – A Visual Essay on Street Art in The Catalan Capital

Barcelona’s street art, for me, is some of the best in Europe. The city’s Raval, Gòtic and Gràcia districts all contain plenty of powerful, sometimes obtrusive street art that reflects the tensions and strugges of the region.

Here are some of my photos of the Barcelona’s street art.

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Camera : Iphone 3

Locations: Parque Guell, Caixa Forum, Barri Raval, Barcelona

Barcelona, Spain. Visual Inspiration from Turó de la Rovira

The next article in my Barcelona series is a throwback to my last trip to the city in 2015 with 2 of my best friends. Barcelona was the first city of our road trip (we went on to Valencia and Ibiza thereafter). Thank you to our Catalan friends, Ares, Aina and Claudia, for hosting us.

The pics are from a lovely afternoon atop Turó de la Rovira (aka Bunkers del Carmel) – quite possibly the best place to get a 360 view of Barcelona.

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Barcelona, Spain: La Sagrada Familia

Barcelona’s Sagrada Familia has to be the epitomy of a work that will never be complete. While some may irk at its tendency to be covered in tarpaulins from time to time owing to the constant work on it, one can argue that it is this feature that makes it such a memorable place.

Work first began on La Sagrada Familia in the late 1800s. Catalan architecht Antoni Gaudí took charge of the design of the church in 1883 and worked on it for the next 43 years,  until his death in 1926. He was buried in the chapel of Our Lady of Mount Carmel in the crypt of the Sagrada Familia. Many more architechts have since taken  charge of the building process, which is estimated to come to an end later this century.

Here are my pictures of La Sagrada famila- a place of introspection, grandeur and bewilderment.

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Barcelona: No Tenim Por (We are not afraid)

While I was in Barcelona with my family, I was also unfortunately caught up in the van attack on Las Ramblas that left 15 people dead and wounded scores of innocent men, women and children. My stance towards this episode is that I am humbled to be alive and grateful for the gift of life that we so often take for granted.

But I am also angry and baffled – how can any one possibly contemplate an attack on the innocent of this nature and justify it in any way, religious or otherwise? The people that did this (most of whom got themselves shot dead) have no place in any culture – African, Spanish, Catalan, European or other. They know no religion, Islamic or other, and their affiliation to darkness paints an unspectacular if not worrying trail of dereliction in today’s society.

Here are the some of my pictures of the day time stood still in Barcelona.

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Barcelona, Spain – Architecture

Barcelona is always a city that inspires me. I’ve been to the Catalan capital several times now and endured everything from failed robberies in the Raval district to epic Monday nights out at Barcelona’s Apolo nightclub.

This time round, in the company of my family, my visit to Barcelona was a lot more sober. Yet, true to tradition, this city provided us with one remarkable twist of fate after another. Barcelona is also a city of contradictions – excessive tourism on the one hand and far-left protests against it on the other. Tourism in Barcelona is very much a double-edged sword – driving the local economy through massive annual earnings while eroding some of the city’s authenticity and heritage.

Barcelona is a city of contradictions – excessive tourism on the one hand and far-left protests against it on the other. Tourism in Barcelona is very much a double-edged sword – driving the local economy through massive annual earnings while eroding some of the city’s authenticity and heritage.

Similarly, in the midst of a decent city beach (La Barceloneta) that pulls many from far and wide, spectacular architechture and historic areas such as Barri Gòtic and Barri Gràcia, you will also find El Raval – a grimey quarter of town that is does has its charms but is definitely not the safest place to walk around in, particularly for women.

For now – here are the some of my pictures of Barcelona’s iconic architecture.

Casa Milà

Provença, 261-265, 08008 (Off Passeig de Gràcia)

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Casa Batlló

Passeig de Gràcia, 43, 08007

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Park Güell

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The Cityscape – as seen from Park Güell

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The Kenyan Coast, December 2016

This is a journey back to the country I grew up in — this time round in the company of my girlfriend. I find myself guilty, each and every single day, of forgetting just how beautiful a country it was and still is.

Most people relate to Kenya through the glossy images and videos that travel boards market — or through the stories of children in need of food and a penny or two of your donations during prime time broadcasting. Both scenarios present an exaggerated view of a nation of so many facades.

Our journey begins in Mombasa — Kenya’s second city, which is a loud, polluted mess. Many of its hotels of yesteryear are now a distant flicker of the glorious tourism heyday and now stand crumbling — behemoths under the African sun.

But this is Africa though (TIA), so for every crumbling hotel, there is a fighting soul forking out a living for themselves — making ends meet. There is hope, everywhere — a force that is as constant as the lingering heat and the blue of the ocean.

 

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I am no fan of Mombassa but tuk-tuk rides can be fun. This one was

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Mombassa’s Nyali beach is not exactly paradise lost but some of it can be appealing it its own way

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Here, you will find overpriced, half- starved camels that suffer in the hot sun to cure your selfie fetishes. I need not add that these mighty beasts are not native to these parts

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Nonetheless, perched on their back, as in the Lawrence of Arabia days – you will find one tourist after another who thinks it’s cool to plod along the beach in tow

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If you want something a bit more real – wander north to Kilifi – 65 kilometres north of Mombassa. This was taken from the road on the way to my godmother’s house as we ventured inland, past the glittering Kilifi creek

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The real magic starts when you venture south though – to Diani and further on, Galu beach- 33 kilometers  south of Mombassa

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Daybreak  in these parts is an overture, masterfully woven – the water was still enough to paint on that particular morning

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Rupturing the peace ever so slightly, a fishing boat coasted gently along, leaving weak ripples in its wake

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Noon, and the overhead sky never looked more divine. There is something pacifying in the shade of a coconut tree

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Nothing beats the water though

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I am humbled, time and again by these mystical creatures – masters of the seas

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We found this sandbank in the middle of the Ocean, a barrier between the reef and the shore that rears its sandy head at low-tide

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Come dawn, back at shore and the distant clouds are aflame once again

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Clumsy creatures descend from the heavens, strangers in the early night whose arrival on the beach is marked by a short burst of rushing air followed by a thud and the occasional scream.

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Dusk turns symphonic just before the curtain call. I will miss these emphatic colours and the coruscating waters of the Indian Ocean. I will miss the smiling people – my people and their ways under the sun

Tanzania – Living with The Maasai Tribe

In 2015 I was fortunate to live amongst the Maasai of Tanzania as part of a documentary film project and a fundraising initiative organised by myself and my good friend, Lars Ulrik Nielsen. Whilst in Tanzania, we also worked with Albinos at the risk of persecution and discrimination. Here are some of the pictures of our experience. Learn more about our work:

  1. Bitchslap Magazine Interview about My Short Documentary Film, “Bryllup I Bushen” (“The Wedding in The Bush,” made for The Danish Foreign Ministry
  2. Watch the documentary film, “Bryllup I Bushen”
  3. Read an article written about our trip to Africa

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