Nusa Lembongan Island, Indonesia – Part II

This is the second installation of the series on the island of Nusa Lembongan, Indonesia.

This article focuses specifically on Dream Beach – a wonderful sandy beach on the south of the island. Read part I of the article here.

As with many things, the best time ton visit Dream Beach is either early in the morning or late in the afternoon. Nusa Lembongan´s population tends to multiply by a factor of 8 at noon every day when hordes of tourists on day trips from Bali flock to it, which takes the shine off what is otherwise a peaceful island that is home to some very friendly locals.

While on Nusa Lembongan, be sure to explore the nearby islands of Ceningan (accessible by bridge) and Nusa Penida (a 10-min ferry ride will get you there.) Read my article on the island of Nusa Penida here.

Nusa Lembongan Island, Indonesia – Part I

You´ll find Nusa Lembongan just off Bali. If Bali is the raucous upstairs neighbour, Nusa Lembongan is the quiet old man who lives down the street. I love this island and I hope it remains as it is – relatively liberated from the pitfalls of mass tourism. You can easily walk around Nusa Lembongan (or take a scooter or taxi at night) and there are some great surf spots by Jungut Batu Beach!

In this article, you´ll find visual inspiration from Jungut Batu Beach, Mushroom Bay, Devil´s Tear and Sandy Bay. Part II of this article focuses exclusively on Dream Beach.

Scroll to the bottom of this article for tips on where to stay and where to eat.

Jungut Batu Beach

The main beach on the island, more touristy than the rest of it but it´s also where the surf breaks are and you´ll find no shortage of accomodation options + restaurants.

Mushroom Bay

A much quieter alternative to Jungut Batu. Walk 3 minutes away from the beach and you´ll find yourself in jungle-like confines.

Devil´s Tear

Sheer nature at its best. Go there either really early in the morning or late in the afternoon when all the day tourists are done flocking here in their hundreds.

Sandy Bay

A lovely little bay north of Devil´s Tear (walk here from the former – the seaside here is a story in itself.)

Where to stay

Naturale Villas – Basic but very charming. Read my Tripadvisor review here.

Where to eat

Hai Bar & Grill: Try the tuna steak! Read my review here.

Hai Ri Zen: Right alongside the aforementioned Hai Bar & Grill: It´s more upscale but I prefer the former.

Thai Pantry: Waterfont bliss – try one of their juices! Read my review here.

The Deck Cafe and Bar: Also by the water (on the quiet side of Jungut Batu Beach – a great place for morning juice / brunch. Read my review here.

Mola Mola Coffee Shop: A quiet cafe by Mushroom Bay – perfect for watching the sun go down. Read my review here.

Sandy Bay Beach Club: Amazing setting (right by the epic Sandy Bay,) average vibes. Read my review here.

Where to Surf

*The main breaks are all along the long stretch of beach called Jungut Batu.

⁣ * Of these, Playgrounds is the easiest but also the most crowded (get there early.) It´s also the southernmost break of the 4 main breaks here (excluding Tamarind which is further south but poor if you ask me⁣

* Further up, you will find the breaks called “Lacerations,” “No-man´s land,” “Razors” and “Shipwrecks.” – in this order as you go up the coast. As the names suggest, these are not for beginners or intermediates so only paddle out there if you know what you´re doing.⁣

* There are plenty of surf rentals along Jungut Batu (I prefer the ones that are not on the main beach.)⁣

* Carry a water bottle with you if you, like me, walk from one end of the island to the other (you can also hitch a scooter ride.)

Surf life around the globe

I started surfing about 4 years ago in Honolulu, Hawaii. Since then, this hobby has taught me more about myself than 25 plus years of competitive team sports have. The only pressure to perform here is how well you take your next wave.

Here are some of my favourite surf pictures and stories so far. I´ve been fortunate enough to surf on 4 continents, finding enjoyment in each and every break I´ve dragged my board onto.

Hawaii – where it all began

Mauritius – not the best waves by Le Morne (I had to take a boat out to them and they weren´t anything to shout home about but I did see some dolphins underneath my board and that was unforgettable!

Denmark – Cold, not known for surfing but oh such waves!

Løkken – the beach break closest to my home away from home in Jutland

Cold Hawaii, Klitmøller / Vorupør. My favourite surf spot in Denmark

Indonesia – a surfer´s paradise

Jungut Batu – Nusa Lembongan Island – my favourite surf spot in Indonesia – on a small island with very few cars on it


Balangan Beach – the first place I surfed in Indonesia. The break is quite a rough one and it´s popular but there´s a laidback feel to life in these parts that I liked

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There are many facets to Bali's Balangan Beach. From jaw-dropping vistas of the sunset, to that beautiful surf break (apt for novices as well as more advanced surfers.) You'll find numerous surf schools / board rentals along the beach – many of which are located in the timber warungs (family-owned restaurants,) so you can easily catch a great meal after the surf has pummeled you.) I rolled with the dudes from @westcoastbalisurfschool (thx Didi!) but the guys from @dawnpatrolbali are pretty cool too. At this time of year (the start of January,) I found surfing at high tide on a longer board (personal preference) to be easiest. The waves here break 100-200 metres frm the shoreline, come in thick and fast and roll smoothly for 10-20 metres. There's lots of intense white water though – so prepare to roll and duck a fair bit when paddling out and be aware of the strong shoreline current that'll drift you into the rocks at the right of the beach if you lose your bearings. Beyond the surf (swipe right for photo)- I was sad to see a lot of plastic in the water and on the shoreline. Bali has a severe plastic problem and we need to all make an effort to fix it. My suggestion would be for each surf operator / warung / resort, etc. to have optional packages in their setup in which guests can donate towards or better yet, participate in cleaning up the beach themselves. Plastic is everyone's problem, not just Bali's so let's work together because we need to fix it.

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2020 vision 😎

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Batu – Bolong – an easy but crowded break in Canggu, Bali. Truly a surf Mekka